Vermillion native hired by S.D. Corn Growers

Vermillion native hired by S.D. Corn Growers The South Dakota Corn Growers Association and South Dakota Corn Utilization Council are pleased to announce that Paul Skiles has been hired as the Market Development Director for the organizations.

Skiles, a native of Vermillion, is a graduate of South Dakota State University with a bachelor of science degree in agricultural business. He has spent the majority of his professional career as an agronomist beginning with Cenex Land O'Lakes in Pierre, and then at Dakota Fertilizer and Chemical in Canton.

Skiles served as agronomy manager at WFS Elevator in Lewisville, MN, beginning in 1996. He was promoted to location manager in 1998 while continuing to serve as the agronomy manager. Skiles spent 10 years at WFS before he and his family moved to Sioux Falls in 2004. Most recently, he was an agronomist at Fremar Farmers Coop in Marion.

With the rapid growth in agricultural opportunities and their collective mission to advance the profitability of South Dakota corn producers, the SDCGA and SDCUC recognized a need to create a staffing position which would be dedicated to market development and related industries and issues.

Skiles will be monitoring biotechnology, identity preserved issues, transportation, value-added opportunities, conservation and environmental programs and more. He will also coordinate the SDCGA showplot program. Contact Skiles with questions or input on these issues at 605-334-0100.

Skiles and his wife, Julie, have two daughters.

, Coral, 3; and Hailey, 2.

Vermillion native hired by S.D. Corn Growers

May 2, 2005 – The South Dakota Corn Growers Association and South Dakota Corn Utilization Council are pleased to announce that Paul Skiles has been hired as the Market Development Director for the organizations.

Skiles, a native of Vermillion, S.D., is a graduate of South Dakota State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Business. He has spent the majority of his professional career as an agronomist beginning with Cenex Land O'Lakes in Pierre, S.D. and then at Dakota Fertilizer and Chemical in Canton, S.D. Skiles served as agronomy manager at WFS Elevator in Lewisville, Minn., beginning in 1996. He was promoted to location manager in 1998 while continuing to serve as the agronomy manager. Skiles spent 10 years at WFS before he and his family moved to Sioux Falls in 2004. Most recently, he was an agronomist at Fremar Farmers Coop in Marion, S.D.

With the rapid growth in agricultural opportunities and their collective mission to advance the profitability of South Dakota corn producers, the SDCGA and SDCUC recognized a need to create a staffing position which would be dedicated to market development and related industries and issues. Skiles will be monitoring biotechnology, identity preserved issues, transportation, value-added opportunities, conservation and environmental programs and more. He will also coordinate the SDCGA showplot program. Contact Skiles with questions or input on these issues at 605-334-0100.

Skiles and his wife, Julie, have two daughters, Coral, 3; and Hailey, 2.

BROOKINGS, S.D. – Temperatures in the mid-20s in recent days may

have damaged crops, but producers will need at least 72 hours of warmer

weather to evaluate damage, a South Dakota State University specialist

said.

"Growers are going to have to get out there in the field and

see how that crop is responding," SDSU Extension Crops Specialist Bob

Hall. "A word of caution in that regard: It doesn't do any good for the

farmer to go out the morning after the frost and try to determine

whether things are all right. That plant has got to have a little bit of

time to react to that stress and try to recover from it."

Producers need at least three to four days of warmer

temperatures, especially with above-freezing temperatures overnight,

before they'll be able to evaluate how well their crops have dealt with

freezing weather.

Winter wheat damage will likely be variable, with greater risk

to the crop in areas where the crop was under stress from factors such

as drought. Winter wheat in the tillering stage can tolerate

temperatures down into the teens for up to two hours. In the jointing

stage, winter wheat is much more susceptible to freezing temperatures,

especially if the temperature dips to 24 degrees.

Spring-seeded small grains in many cases can tolerate the cold

because plants' growing points are still below ground. But drought

stress in areas short of moisture can make those plants less able to

recover from the frost. Damage will vary depending on such factors, Hall

said.

Corn that hasn't yet emerged faces no problems. Hall said corn

that has emerged may have been burnt back by the frost, but is likely to

recover. In most areas the growing points are still below ground,

offering the plant additional protection. SDSU does not recommend mowing

corn that has been emerged in order to cut away damaged tissue – there's

no evidence that it helps the plants recover, Hall said.

"If it's been burnt off, just let Mother Nature take its course

and leave it alone," Hall said.

Alfalfa shoots may have been burnt or blackened by frost. As

with corn, Hall recommends leaving the damaged tissue alone. As the

temperature warms up, new shoots will replace those that have been

damaged.

Hall said he's also fielded a few questions about cold injury to

peas. Peas are one of the crops in the region best equipped to recover

from frost injury. Once again, wait for a spell of warmer weather to

evaluate how well the plant is recovering.

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