Breast cancer screening saves lives

Breast cancer screening saves lives
This year in South Dakota more than 520 women are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and more than 100 women are expected to die from the disease. Significant progress has been made in mammography technology to assist physicians in diagnosing the disease at an early stage, usually before physical symptoms develop.

When breast cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, before it has spread to lymph nodes or other locations in the body, the five-year survival rate is 98 percent. As a result of improved early detection, breast cancer survivors make up the largest group of cancer survivors.

October 2005 marks more than 20 years of educating women about breast cancer early detection, diagnosis and treatment during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Throughout the month, the American Cancer Society encourages women age 40 and older to make an appointment for an annual mammogram.

Mammography screening is the most effective method of early detection and has been proven to increase treatment options and save lives.

In addition to promoting early detection of breast cancer, the American Cancer Society has a variety of local and national programs and services available to assist women who have received a breast cancer diagnosis, are undergoing treatment or are post-treatment. A local American Cancer Society Navigator is serving every community in South Dakota and can connect those facing breast cancer with local programs and services to meet their individual needs.

For more information about breast cancer diagnosis, screening or treatment options, or to speak to your local navigator, call the American Cancer Society at 1.800.ACS.2345 or visit www.cancer.org.

The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by saving lives, diminishing suffering and preventing cancer through research, education, advocacy and service. Founded in 1913 and with national headquarters in Atlanta, the society has 13 regional divisions and local offices in 3,400 communities, involving millions of volunteers across the United States. For more information anytime, call toll free 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.

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