Sesquicentennial Highlights

Sesquicentennial Highlights By: Cleo Erickson Excerpts from the Plain Talk 1906 continued Many fields are infested with grasshoppers. No one knows what purpose they serve except they eat the crops. Gus Cayce brought in his annual mammoth catfish from the Missouri River last week.�? It weighed nearly 90 lbs. And was dispensed rapidly from Hadleyâ�?�?s Market. This is a banner year for the fruit growers of Clay County.�? The plums are ready for the market and it is estimated that 5,000-bushel will be on the market soon. Several steam threshing machines have been put up in the county this fall.�?  Claude Huetson unloaded a mammoth Garr-Scott Stea-mer on Saturday. At a meeting of the city council last evening the Mayor was authorized to appoint a committee of five citizens to arrange for a public reception for Dr. F. B. Gault, the newly elected President of the University. The hardware store in Meckling, owned by Will Schrader, together with the post office fixtures, mail, etc., were totally destroyed by fire last Thursday night about midnight.�? The origin of the fire is a mystery. Seven citizens of foreign countries signified their intentions of becoming U S citizens last month.�? Of those, Ole Wick, Knut Rodvold, Jacob Vik are from Norway; Carl Stop and Adolph Wellberg are from Sweden and Christian Volber is from Germany. The total number of pupils attending public schools at this time is 425.�?  Of this number 118 are taking high school courses.�?  There are 42 pupils in the public schools who pay tuition, 36 of which are in high school, 28 of them being graduates of the 8th grade schools throughout the county. A new courthouse would be a fine advertisement for Clay County.�? The voters should see to it that a new home for the county officials is erected. Mr. Hyde bought that $600.00 house.�? But I can sell you a seven-room dwelling, near the courthouse, at $15.00 per month, or a four-room house with an acre of ground, east of the University, at $7.00 per month.�? Only the rich can afford to pay rent.�? Own your own home.�? If you have town property or a farm that you will sell cheap, let me try to dispose of it for you.�?  Contact:�?  E. E. Coll-ins Lee and Prentis Store is now being illuminated by a new method of gasoline lighting.�? If the system ret-ains its present high efficiency it is possible that a company will be formed to light the business houses and residences in this manner, and eventually put in a system for street lighting. Mrs. Brown, the fortune teller who can read your future by the palms of your hand or with cards, is sojourning at the Chandler House and is willing to make everything clear for you during the rest of the week. The girls of the VHS basketball team went to Elk Point last Saturday and trimmed the team of that cityâ�?�?s high school 16 to 5. A return game will be played here in the near future. The Rea Brothers, the itinerant Doctors, who made Vermillion a stopping point, have again invaded the state and are advertising their wonderful cures in the Sioux Falls papers.�? They have not yet ventured into Vermillion territory, which reminds us that we have got a good thrashing coming that they promised us when we printed some truth about them on occasion of their former visit. We have been living in suspense in Vermillion ever since. The water tank and the old â�?�?morgueâ�? back of the main building are being torn down. This destroys another old landmark for the athletes of the Unive-rsity. It brings to mind the times when new men found â�?�?hot dopeâ�? always on hand, and when the only indoor track was around the stove in West Hall basement. Something should be done to improve the roads leading into Vermillion.�?  Many of these roads should come under the supervision of townships adjoining, but they should be improved just the same. The Methodist ladies will serve their annual Thanksgiving dinner in the basement of the church on Thursday beginning at 11:30 AM.�? The following menu will be served: Roast Duck with Dressing. Roast Chicken â�?�? Chicken Pie. Cranberry Jelly. Mashed Potatoes â�?�? Baked Beans. Salad Pickles. White Bread â�?�? Brown Bread. Celery â�?�? Jelly â�?�? Coffee. Apple, Mince, Pumpkin Pie. Children under 10 years, 20 cents; 10 to 15 years, 25 cents; adults, 35 cents. With corn plentiful and a wage of 5 cents a bushel being paid, the corn huskers are making some nice money these days â�?�? when it doesnâ�?�?t rain. Eggs 27 cents per dozen, butter 22 cents per pound, beefsteak and pork steak 10 to 15 cents per pound, milk 6 cents per quart, 4 foot cottonwood, $4.50 per cord, good soft coal $8.50 per ton delivered, hard coal $10.00 per ton.�? Verily the married man of moderate means has just cause for wishing that he were able to cut out the winter months. During the winter months Palmerâ�?�?s Market will not be open on Sundays. Bear this in mind and order your Sunday meats the day before. End 1906. Excerpts taken from a historical edition of the Vermillion Plain Talk published in 1905-1906. 2009 will mark the 150th birthday of the city of Vermillion. Each week until the sesquicentennial celebration, this column will present notable historic information pertaining to the city and surrounding areas.

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